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Promotional Toolkit

Learn more about promoting your research.

Promoting your research

After publishing your article Wiley works hard to promote and increase the visibility of your work – making it easy for people to find, read, comment, and ultimately cite your work.


But the best, most effective person to promote your article is you.


We encourage you to promote your article, to help maximize and measure the impact of your research. And we’ll help you every step of the way. Watch the video below or view this infographic to find out how you can promote your research:




First steps

Read our Author Promotional Toolkit covering Email, Social Media/Networking, Conferences, SEO, Wider Web, Publicity, and Multimedia marketing.


Article sharing

Wiley offers two content sharing opportunities for authors to disseminate both newly-published and previously-published research, Wiley Content Sharing and Article Share. Click here to learn more about sharing your research.


You can share your article at any stage of publication. Download our Article Sharing Guidelines [PDF] to see how and when different versions of your article may be shared. You can also visit our Article Sharing Policy page for more information.


Measuring your impact

Wiley also helps you measure the impact of your research – supported through our specialist partnerships with Kudos and Altmetric, as well as citation tracking on Wiley Online Library.


Journal metrics overview

Some of the most common journal metrics are described in the table below. “JCR Year” refers to the Journal Citation Report year, which is the individual year for which a metric is provided.


Metric Name Metric Source Metric Description
Impact Factor Web of Science The Impact Factor is the average number of times articles from the journal published in the past two years have been cited in the JCR year. The Impact Factor is calculated by dividing the number of citations in the JCR year by the total number of articles published in the two previous years.
5-Year Impact Factor Web of Science The 5-year Impact Factor is the average number of times articles from the journal published in the past five years have been cited in the JCR year. It is calculated by dividing the number of citations in the JCR year by the total number of articles published in the five previous years.
Altmetrics (Any source) Altmetrics go beyond more traditional citation metrics to measure social visibility around scientific articles. These metrics are based on a broad spectrum of indicators, such as tweets, blog mentions, news media, social bookmarking, article views, and downloads.
Eigenfactor Web of Science The Eigenfactor is based on weighted citations in the JCR year to papers published within the previous 5 years. Citations are weighted according to the prestige of the citing journal, with citations from highly ranked journals making a larger contribution to the Eigenfactor than those from poorly ranked journals.
Google Scholar Metrics Google Scholar The main Google Scholar journal metric is the H5 index and is based on articles published in the last 5 complete calendar years. This is similar to the h-Index but also includes the top cited h articles (h-core) and the median of the citation counts (h-median).
h-index Web of Science, Google Scholar, or Scopus The h-index attempts to measure the productivity and citation impact of the published body of work of an author. The h-index indicates the number of papers, h, that have been cited at least h times (e.g. an h-index of 15 means that 15 papers have been cited at least 15 times each.) Note: Due to variations in citation coverage between databases, each source may determine a different value of the h-index for each author.
Immediacy Index Web of Science The Immediacy Index is the average number of times an article is cited in the year it is published. The Immediacy Index is calculated by dividing the number of citations to articles published in a given year by the number of articles published in that year.
SJR Scopus The SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) Indicator is based on weighted citations in Year X to papers published in the previous 3 years. Citations are weighted by the prestige of the citing journal, so that a citation from a top journal will have more impact than a citation from a low-ranked journal.
SNIP Scopus The Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures average citations in Year X to papers published in the previous 3 years. Citations are weighted by the citation potential of the journal’s subject category, thereby making the metric more comparable across different disciplines.